DreadBall 3-on-3: Action Token Cards

3on3

Last week a change to 3-on-3 to use cards to replace the massive pile of tokens was put forward. This week we have those cards for you to print out and try.

The cards are designed to be printed as mini cards, 2″ x 2.75″.

poker-vs-mini

Each Coach starts with

  • 15 Standard Activations
  • 5 SinBin Activations
  • 3 Card Draw Activations
  • 2 Another Turn Activations

Cards

Here is a PDF file with all 50 cards laid out in sheets.

action_token_cards_mini_v1

This PDF will also be available on the Documents page.

And don’t forget the back of the card.

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Card Back

Rules & Regs: Threat (Part 2)

There are some Abilities that can be confusing. Abilities that modify or change the way Threat works are often misunderstood. In Part 1 we looked at Gotcha and Threatening as well as the the basics of Threat. In Part 2 we will look at the Keeper and Stench Abilities.

Keeper

The Keeper Ability allows a Guard to project 1 Threat onto any hexes in the Strike Zone that are in their front arc as long as the Player with the Keeper ability is also within the Strike Zone. This is a goal tender Ability meant to allow a single Player to better protect a Strike Zone.

Keeper and Gotcha

The Gotcha Ability does not improve the Keeper Ability. If a Player has both Keeper and Gotcha Abilities they still only project 1 Threat on the hexes of the Strike Zone in their front arc, not 2 Threat. The Player with Gotcha would still project 2 Threat into their regular Threat Hexes.

keeper_gotcha

Stench

Stench projects a negative modifier of 1 into all adjacent hexes of the Player with the Ability. Any Opposing Player in one of these adjacent hexes is affected and suffers a -1 modifier on all tests.

stench

Stench does not apply Threat. Stench applies a separate negative modifier that stacks with Threat. Stench does not stack with other Stench. As you can see in the image the negative modifier is still only -1 where the Player’s Stench Abilities overlap.

stench2

Keeper and Stench

A Keeper with the Stench ability would project 1 Threat to any Strike Zone hexes in their front arc (as long as they were in the Strike Zone) and the Stench modifier would stack with this in any of the Keepers adjacent hexes increasing the overall negative modifier to 2.

Keeper, Stench, and Gotcha

A Keeper with the Stench and Gotcha Abilities would project 1 Threat to any Strike Zone hexes in their front arc (as long as they were in the Strike Zone) and the Stench modifier would stack with this in any of the Keepers adjacent hexes increasing the overall negative modifier by 1. The adjacent hexes in the Keepers front arc would be under 2 Threat from Gotcha so the total negative modifier in these hexes would be 3.

keeper_gotcha_stench

 

 

Hobby Highlight: Team In A Can™

What if it were possible to combine these things?

team-in-a-can-idea

This was the idea: DreadBall Team in a Can

Taking advantage of the Mark 5 DreadBall bases that all of my DreadBall models are mounted on I set out to make the idea of a team in a can a reality.

A bit if history. If you are not familiar with my GeoffTec Mark V bases (I find that hard to believe) you can check out the journey I went on to create them here: Hobby Highlight: DreadBall Bases

To begin the process of creating the GeoffTec Team in a Can™ (TIAC™) I went to Thingiverse.com. After some searching, I found a 3D model of a screw lid can that I liked.

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The can wasn’t the right size so I imported the .stl file into TinkerCAD and resized it as well as making some modifications.

team-in-a-can-can

In addition to some small stylistic changes, spaces for 10mm x 1mm neodymium magnets were added. The magnets hold the inner components of TIAC™ in place. The inner components were designed next. Inside TIAC™ are tiers with magnetized slots for DreadBall Players (mounted on MKV base inserts), Mark V bases, DreadBalls, etc. The modular design on TIAC™ allows for multiple, reconfigurable loadouts.

team-in-a-can-tiers

Once all the components were 3D printed on an Ender 3 printer, many 10mm x 1mm magnets were glued into place. (Don’t tell but I actually ran out of 10mm x 1mm magnets and had to double up on 10mm x 0.5mm magnets in a few places.)

I present to you the GeoffTec Team in a Can™:

team-in-a-can-finished-opening

Rules and Regs: Threat (Part 1)

There are a few Abilities that tend to cause some confusion. Two such Abilities that seem to frequently come up are Gotcha and Threatening. Both of these Abilities affect the way Threat is applied in certain situations. Let’s start with a quick look at the basics of Threat.

Threat

Threat is a negative modifier on a test. All Players project Threat into their front 3 hexes known as that Player’s Threat Hexes.

basic_threat
FIG 1: Player A Threatens their front 3 hexes known as their Threat Hexes.

When a Player needs to make a test, if they are in an Opposing Player’s Threat Hexes they will have a -1 on their test. (Note: There are a few tests that are not affected by Threat as indicted in the rules. For example Armor Tests are not affected by Threat.)

basic_threat_minus1
FIG 2: Player B is attempting to Pick up the Ball but has a -1 (one less dice) because Player A is Threatening Player B

Threat modifiers stack but only to a maximum of -2. Threat does not apply if the Opposing Player is participating in the test because it is an (X) test (an (X) test is a test where your success’ are compared to your opponent’s success’, also known as an Opposed Test).

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FIG 3: Player B is attempting to Pick up the Ball. Even though Player B is Threatened by 3 opposing Players (A, C, D), Player B is only at a -2 on their test because -2 is the most Threat possible
opposed_no_threat
FIG 4: Player A is Slamming Player B. Neither Player has any negative modifiers because Threat does not apply from Players involved in an opposed (X) test.

Threatening (Ability)

“This Player’s Threat Hexes always modify a test (up to the maximum) if the modifier is listed. For example, if a Threatening Player Slams an opponent then that target Player will receive a-1 modifier for being in the Slamming Player’s Threat Hex.”

Some Players start with or can aquire the Threatening ability. All Threatening does is change the rules for this Player so that their Threat DOES apply during an opposed (X) test.

threatening
FIG 5: Player A is Slamming Player B. Because Player A has the Threatening ability their Threat applies even during the opposed Slam test so Player B has a -1 on their test.

What tends to confuse some coaches is the part of the rule that states “(up to the maximum)”. This just means that even with Threatening the maximum Threat allowed is still -2.

Gotcha (Ability)

“Some Players are very tricky to get away from. Even a single Player with this ability causes the maximum -2 modifier for threatening an opponent during a test. A Player with Gotcha may Restrain an opponent as normal, taking the modifier to -3.”

The Gotcha ability allows a single player to apply the maximum Threat of -2 all by themselves.

gotcha_max_minus_2_
FIG 6: Player A is Slamming Player B with assistance from Player C. Player C has the Gotcha ability so is Threatening Player B for -2. Player B is at -2 on the test

The maximum Threat allowed is still -2. If a Player with the Gotcha ability and another player are both Threatening one of their opponents, that opponent is only at a -2.

gotcha_max_minus_2
FIG 7: Player A is Slamming Player B with assistance from Player A’s teammates Player C and Player D. Player C has the Gotcha ability so is Threatening Player B for -2. Player D is also Threatening Player B for -1. The combined Threat of Players C and D is -3 but because the maximum Threat allowed is -2, Player B is only at -2 on the test.

What can confuse some coaches is the mention in the Gotcha rules of a -3 modifier in the last sentence. The -3 only happens if the Player with Gotcha chooses to do a Restrain Foul when one of their opponents attempts to Evade out of one of their Threat Hexes.

Threatening AND Gotcha

Both the Threatening and Gotcha abilities are powerful on their own but when a Player has both of these abilities they are very powerful indeed.

This combination of abilities allows a single Player to apply a -2 Threat to an opponent even during a opposed test.

gotcha_and_threatening
FIG 8: Player A with Gotcha and Threatening is Slamming Player B. Player B is at a -2 on the test.

 

Hopefully this article has helped to clear up any confusion any coaches might have had regarding Threat.

If a future article I will look closer at the Stench and Keeper abilites and how they apply additional Threat and negative modifiers as well.

Scattered Scullery: Action Token Tracking

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So you have your Action Tokens and it’s your Rush. How to keep track of how many Actions you’ve used and which players you’ve used them on? There are a few options.

The Action Token Tracker

Some pitches, including the new pitch that comes with 2nd Edition DreadBall, have a dedicated area to track your Action Token usage. Simply place the token on the player number in the Action Token tracking area. There’s even a space to track Action Tokens spent to buy cards.

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Pros: Simple.

Cons: Players must be numbered between 1-14. Takes more space on the Pitch.

The Rush Tracker

If the Pitch you’re using doesn’t have a dedicated Action Token tracking area you can use the Rush Tracker. There are 14 Rushes so as long as your players are numbered 1-14 just place your Action Tokens beside the Rush number matching the player number. If your Rush Tracker has a “0” space use that to track buying cards.

Pros: Uses an already existing feature of the Pitch.

Cons: Players must be numbered between 1-14.

On The Pitch

If you don’t have a dedicated Action Token tracking area and don’t like using the Rush Tracker as an alternative you can always just place your Action Tokens on the Pitch beside the player the Token is being used on. For buying cards just place the Action Token near the game deck.

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Pros: Players don’t need to be numbered at all.

Cons: Clutters the Pitch

In Your Head

This one is pretty obvious. If you find you can just remember and your opponent trusts you then just keep track in your head.

memory-tokens

Pros: No Restrictions.

Cons: Requires being able to remember. 😛

Scattered Scullery: Evolution of The Pitch

For everyone that prefers a low-profile DreadBall pitch, I’ve put together another card. Before we introduce the new card, let’s go over a bit of history.

The Original Pitch

When DreadBall was first released in 2012, it came with a board for a pitch.  This 1st Edition pitch was much simpler and much smaller with a lower profile (low-profile) on the table than the larger 2nd Edition pitches we’re familiar with today.

1e_dreadball_board
Original 1st Edition Pitch

 

Action Tracker and Pitch Evolution

As more and more Coaches took to the game, they began to see opportunities to improve upon the basic 1st edition folding board pitch. The idea of printing the pitch on a neoprene mat was attractive. Without the original artwork for the pitch, we had to recreate the entire pitch design before we could print it. The first new designs were merely recreations of the original, but on neoprene.

Hyperdyne_Arena_28x14
Hyperdyne Arena

Those neoprene pitches were nice, but the hexes were the same size as the original. Often players on the pitch, when next to each other, did not have enough room. The next pitch designs increased the hex size from the original 25mm to a spacious 30mm.

The larger hexes were great and opened the door to the concept of improving the DreadBall pitch. In late 2013 and early 2014, features that would require a larger area were added; spaces for the card deck, discard pile, and Action Token storage. One of the first larger pitches incorporating these features was the Neo-Tek Tesla Dome.

Neo-Tek_v8_24x28_v6
Neo-Tek Tesla Dome by SHAWN GRUBAUGH

The improvments continued:

  • Coaching Dice area
  • Ball launch direction indicators
  • Strike values
  • Standarized scatter direction
  • Action Token tracker
  • Assistant Coach areas

687474703a2f2f332e62702e626c6f6773706f742e636f6d2f2d66657268766367794453412f564d6642707a3865504e492f4141414141414141434e6f2f4e644443464e646e3941592f73313630302f32387832345f41315f44

Mantic, acknowledging the fan improvements, released their own large size neoprene pitch that included the new pitch additions. It was named the Gruba-Tek VII Coliseum as a nod to Shawn Grubaugh who, as mentioned, created one of the first large size pitches.

Gruba-Tek-VII-Coliseum
Gruba-Tek VII Coliseum

1st Edition Cards and Player Numbers

The Action Token tracker was added as a nice way to keep track of how many Action Tokens a Coach was spending on players. The Action Token tracker was numbered 1 to 14, with an area to indicate if a Coach had used a token to purchase a card as well.

The tracker could be numbered from 1-14 because in 1st Edition DreadBall, all players HAD to be numbered between 1 and 14. This numbering requirement was based on the way the cards worked in 1st Edition. The cards in 1st Edition DreadBall often affected a random player. To determine which random player, a Coach would draw a card and read the numbers down the right hand side of the cards. The first number (1 to 14) that matched a player on the pitch indicated that player had been randomly selected.

1e_card.png
1st Edition Action Card with player randomizer down the right hand side

2nd Edition and Player Numbers

When Mantic decided to release a 2nd edition of DreadBall, they looked at what fans had been doing with the pitch design and decided to incorporate almost all of the additional features into the official 2nd Edition pitch. This meant the new official pitch was of the large variety, on a quad-fold board.

DB-Pitch-iso
Official 2nd Edition DreadBall Pitch Design

The random selection of players was removed in 2nd Edition. There was no longer a requirement for players to be numbered only between 1 and 14. Despite no longer being limited in the numbering of players, the Action Token tracker remained on the new official pitch, still using 1-14.

This Coach’s Opinion

I have played on all of these different pitch designs across many different versions of the game. Overall, the fan additions that Mantic adopted into the official design are fantastic.

In my opinion, the Action Token track should have been removed from the 2nd Edition pitch. It’s a nice feature, but it’s not needed. Keeping track of your Action Tokens can be done in a few other ways. With no requirement to number players using only 1-14 for player randomization, leaving the Action Token tracker on the pitch in 2nd Edition has always bothered me. That mentioned, it is an easy way to track your player Actions and can certainly help coaches that are just learning DreadBall.

I’ve stated many times that I prefer the smaller, low-profile pitches, closer in size to the original 1st Edition pitch. There is no room on a low-profile pitch for a dedicated Action Token tracker area. Since I know many coaches like the Action Token tracker but may also have seen the benefits of a low-profile pitch, I’ve created an Action Token track card that can be placed beside a low-profile pitch.

New Action Tracker Card

Here is the new card(s). They are designed to fit on big cards (3.5″ x 5.75″). There is a version with and without a designateds area to tuck your Fan Checks under as well as 2 different numbering patterns, Left to Right and Top to Bottom.

The Features of a State-of-the-Art Low-Profile Pitch

Wrapping up, let’s take a look at all the feature on a modern low-profile pitch. It’s a long way from that original pitch from back in 2012.

pitch_features

EDIT: See all our pitches HERE including my newest design made for the Ontario DreadBall Leage (ODBL).

Dreadball_2018_Pitch_28x14_ODBL_v3_30
Ontario DreadBall League Pitch

Hobby Highlight: Sideline Card

When I play DreadBall I prefer a narrow low-profile pitch instead of the larger pitches. I like the smaller table space the low-profile pitches take up and the portability.

low_profile

One of the few drawbacks is the lack of a sideline to place Support Staff. The solution: Sideline Card.

Support_Staff_Side_Card

The Sideline Card is simply placed along the side of the low-profile pitch of your choice and used to track when your Support Staff (Assistant Coaches and Cheerleaders) are available to be used.

pitch-w-side-cards

If you don’t have or use Fan Support cards (Home/Visitor) to put your Fan Checks under you can also use an alternate version of the Sideline Card.

Support_Staff_Side_Card_w_Fan_Checks

The Sideline Card is designed to be printed on a ‘Big Card’ (3.5″ x 5.75″). Here is a suitably large card back.

large_card_DB_back

Hobby Highlight: Storage and Transport

Let’s talk about how we store and transport our DreadBall miniatures. For the purposes of this discussion lets assume the miniatures in question are painted. Unpainted miniatures can be stored and transported in just about any container you can imagine and there’s not much point in displaying unpainted minis.

Once your miniatures are painted, you, like me, will probably want to be a bit more careful with them so as not to damage the beautiful paint job you have done. You might also want to put your pretty models on display to show people how amazing they are.

Display

Obviously all it takes to display miniatures is to set them on a surface where people can see them but if you want to get fancy a display case is the way to go.

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Detolf from Ikea

I use a Detolf case from Ikea. It is afordable and it looks great. Because a lot of miniature gamers use the Detolf to diplay their models there are several upgrades available. You can get extra shelves and all kinds of fancy lighting systems.

Storage

If you’re not really into displaying your DreadBall miniatures you’ll at least need a way to store them.

I use miniature cases to store my models that aren’t on display. You can get all sorts of cases from many different companies using foam or even magnets to keep your miniatures safe. The cases I primarily use are from a Kickstarter. They are Mantis (not to be confused with Mantic) cases. They are basic cardboard boxes that hold foam trays with slots for miniatures. I know a few companies make cases similar to this, for example KR Multicase.

mantis_case
Mantic Miniature Case
KRM_1
KR Multicase basic cardboard case

For storage purposes you can also use Plano storage cases. BreadDoll editor Andrew uses this system to store his entire collection and it works great for organization. You can get this type of case just about anywhere.

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Plano Storage

Michaels sells a set of storage containers that are similar to Plano boxes in multiple colours.

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Michaels Craft Keeper

Keep in mind when using these plastic storage boxes that if you also intend to use them not just for storage but to transport your minis, you might want to add some padding to them. Adding some paper towel or tissue with the minis in the boxes will help prevent your paint jobs from getting damaged by the harder plastic of the cases.

Once upon a time DreadBall teams came in clamshell cases. You may still be able to find some of these older retail teams in stores. The clamshell cases work well enough to store a single team. The clamshell cases came with a couple thin layers of foam. If you want more you can always make your own upgraded foam insert.

Mantic_Case_Insert.png
Clamshell case with custom foam insert

While hard to find now, if you have an old first edition box set of DreadBall, there were custom foam inserts created to fit inside the box.

Dreadball_Foam_Tray_Kit_Box_Set_No_Models__46568.1353087484.1280.1280

I’ve also seen coaches take foam miniature trays and cut them down to fit in the newer 2nd edition DreadBall box set. These are really good if you only have a couple teams and want to keep them stored in the offical retail box while protecting the paint jobs.

Transportation

If you don’t always play DreadBall at home you will need to transport your minis to where you will be playing. Many if not all of the storage solutions above may also be used to transport your minis, especially if you are careful.

Personally I like a smaller case to transport my minis as I tend to only take 1 or 2 teams at a time when I travel to play. My case of choice is the Feldherr MINI . The MINI is the perfect case in my opinion. It holds a couple teams and is fairly inexpensive for great quality. I also really like the Aquilla 1 or Aquilla 5 by KR Multicase. They’re also not too big, not too expensive, and have alots of room for a couple DreadBall teams.

Feldherr-MI02SBO-Feldherr-MINI-Figuren-Tasche-mix_5.jpg
Feldherr MINI Case

Summation

There are TONS of solutions for storing and transporting your painted DreadBall minis. I’ve gone over some of what I use and what I have seen. If you have a solution you think is great, please comment and let us all know what it is.

Making A New Pitch: Part 1

I’m gonna keep it short and sweet this week. I’ve created many custom pitches since I started playing DreadBall. The design has evolved over time to my current favorite.

Dreadball_2018_Pitch_28x14_BreadDoll
My favorite pitch. The BreadDoll pitch.

The BreadDoll pitch has ball launch arrows, ball launch/scatter directions on both the Home and Visitor sides of the pitch, bounce direction references for maximum distance launches, and strike value pips. It’s a narrow, “low profile” pitch which I prefer for it’s portability.

While I’m still working (however slowly) on making a 3-dimensional pitch I’m also in the mood to make a new 2-dimensional (traditional) DreadBall pitch.

There a few pitches over the years that I started working on but never finished as well as a few I wanted to make but never started on. I’ve decided to work on one of the unfinshed pitches and finsih it up using all the design elements of the BreadDoll pitch (above).

Unfinished designs:

  • Lava Pitch
  • Z’zor Hive Pitch
  • Underwater Pitch

I’m leaning towards the water or Z’zor pitch but let me know which one you’d like me to work on.

 

Hobby Highlight: Renewed Vigor (Cyborgs)

At Adepticon back in March I decided to play a Cyborg team. I wanted to go for a chrome look. I mocked up some color tests. I liked the way the chrome effect looked in the tests and decided to see how it would look painted on the minis.

COLOR TEST

PAINTING MY CYBORGS

BASE COAT

  • Primer: Airbrush Stynylrez Grey
  • Spray entire mini with Reaper MSP 09029: Earth Brown
  • Wash with Army Painter Strong Tone
  • Spray from above with white
  • Lighter spray from above with Army Painter Troglodyte Blue

ARMOR/CYBERNETICS

  • Run black outlines along the armor lines and recesses
  • In the armor breaks use Army Painter Necromancer Cloak
  • Highlight the edges of the armor with white

SKIN

  • Army Painter Necrotic Flesh
  • Wash with Secret Weapon Sewer Water
  • Highlight using Necrotic Flesh mixed with white

CLOTH

  • Army Painter Wolf Grey
  • Citadel Nuln Oil wash
  • Highlight with Wolf Grey

STRAPS

  • Army Painter Leather Brown
  • Wash with Citadel Agrax Earth Shade
  • Highlight with Leather Brown mixed with Army Painter Ash Grey

DETAILS

  • Paint the eyes white
  • Paint the glowy bits red adding a bit of a glow effect with a light drybrush
  • Add a white highlight to the red glowy bits
  • Paint the wires with Game Color Sun Yellow and then wash them with Secret Weapon Orange wash
  • Highlight the wires with a mix of Sun Yellow and white

LOGO

I always like to do a fun logo for my teams when I have time. For Renewed Vigor I looked around for a zombie silhouette and then made it look a more cyborg-ish.

renewed_vigor

RESULTS

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Renewed Vigor Reference Card